I’m at the point where I’ve pretty much stopped asking most Sandy Hook deniers any serious questions, including those that may ultimately prove useful in illustrating the numerous, grievous flaws in their already dubious claims. This is partly due to the fact that the overwhelming majority of them are pathological liars, and I choose not to waste my time with their nonsense. But more so than anything else, it’s because they simply cannot or will not answer them. As an example, ask Wolfgang Halbig why he continues to use such blurry, low-quality copies of Shannon Hick’s infamous evacuation photos in his near-daily rambling, unsolicited e-mails and you’ll be treated to a wall of gibberish that not only fails to even acknowledge the original question, but attempts to cajole you into answering somewhere around fifty of his own. It’s what’s commonly known as a Gish Gallop, and it’s as exhausting as it is intellectually dishonest. But one question I do still ask from time to time – a question no one has attempted to answer as of this writing – is this: if the school closed in 2008, where did its ~633 students go?
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The students and particularly the faculty of Sandy Hook Elementary School had a well-documented love of reading, from school-wide events celebrating children’s classics such as “Stuart Little”to being the very first school in the district to offer Kindles to their students through the library; to having local figures, such as politicians and newscasters, come in and read to students; to hosting a number of children’s authors, such as Jacquiline Davies, Barbara McClintock, Patricia Polacco, and Tomie DePaola. And Dawn Hochsprung, who took over as school principal in 2010, surely only deepened that appreciation by doing things such as dressing up as the Book Fairy, as shown here in the November 23, 2012 print edition of the Newtown Bee:
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